My thoughts on social and scientific issues
Saturday, October 23, 2004
  Forbes.com: Nanotechnology's Disruptive Future
Forbes.com: Nanotechnology's Disruptive Future
 
  USATODAY.com - CDC urged to rein in obesity now
USATODAY.com - CDC urged to rein in obesity now
 
  Launch of the Online Journal of Nanotechnology at AZoNano.com
Launch of the Online Journal of Nanotechnology at AZoNano.com
 
  A New Culprit In Depression? Study Finds Surprising Differences In Gene Activity In The Brains Of Depressed People
A New Culprit In Depression? Study Finds Surprising Differences In Gene Activity In The Brains Of Depressed People
 
  Regional News of Friday, 15 October 2004
Regional News of Friday, 15 October 2004
 
  allAfrica.com: Mozambique: Possible Vaccine Against Malaria On Sight
allAfrica.com: Mozambique: Possible Vaccine Against Malaria On Sight
 
  Captain America
Captain America
 
  Betterhumans > Early Brain-machine Interface Test Promising
Betterhumans > Early Brain-machine Interface Test Promising
 
  Lexington Herald-Leader | 10/14/2004 | Cellular strategy
Lexington Herald-Leader | 10/14/2004 | Cellular strategy
 
  Lexington Herald-Leader | 10/14/2004 | Cellular strategy
Lexington Herald-Leader | 10/14/2004 | Cellular strategy
 
  Nano research joins the dots
Nano research joins the dots
 
  China firms set up plants in Singapore
China firms set up plants in Singapore
 
  China firms set up plants in Singapore
China firms set up plants in Singapore
 
  UF scientists have bionanotechnology recipe to find elusive bacteria
UF scientists have bionanotechnology recipe to find elusive bacteria
 
  BrachySil trial given thumbs up
BrachySil trial given thumbs up
 
  Swiss research boosted by reverse brain drain (English Window, NZZ Online, 11. 10. 2004)
Swiss research boosted by reverse brain drain (English Window, NZZ Online, 11. 10. 2004)
 
  Fears About New Cholesterol Drug
Fears About New Cholesterol Drug
 
  Increasing Use of Nanobiotechnology by the Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industries Anticipated?
Increasing Use of Nanobiotechnology by the Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industries Anticipated?
 
  Daily Nebraskan - Grant will assist study of mental illness perceptions
Daily Nebraskan - Grant will assist study of mental illness perceptions
 
  El Paso Times Online
El Paso Times Online
 
  Houston firms take aim at nanotechnology patents - 2004-10-06 - Houston Business Journal
Houston firms take aim at nanotechnology patents - 2004-10-06 - Houston Business Journal
 
  Nanotech market expected to grow - 2004-10-04 - The Business Review (Albany)
Nanotech market expected to grow - 2004-10-04 - The Business Review (Albany)
 
  EUROPA - Research - Headlines - Unmasking the molecular secrets of marine diatoms
EUROPA - Research - Headlines - Unmasking the molecular secrets of marine diatoms
 
  Free Will and the Anthropogenic Earth: Part I
Free Will and the Anthropogenic Earth: Part I
 
  Nanoscience and megamillions - ithacajournal.com
Nanoscience and megamillions - ithacajournal.com
 
  PM - Chronic diseases rising among indigenous Australians
PM - Chronic diseases rising among indigenous Australians
 
  Scientists' message to generous politicians: Where's ours? - Election 2004 - www.smh.com.au
Scientists' message to generous politicians: Where's ours? - Election 2004 - www.smh.com.au
 
 
 
  IN YOUR HEAD � IV | Tackling depression : HindustanTimes.com
IN YOUR HEAD � IV | Tackling depression : HindustanTimes.com
 
  BioTECHCONNECT: India and Israel Emphasize Nanotech Sector Growth
BioTECHCONNECT: India and Israel Emphasize Nanotech Sector Growth
 
  HoustonChronicle.com - Rice's nano studies offer hope to fix buckyballs
HoustonChronicle.com - Rice's nano studies offer hope to fix buckyballs
 
  Rice finds 'on-off switch' for buckyball toxicity
Rice finds 'on-off switch' for buckyball toxicity
 
  Auckland kids are five times more likely than those in other developed countries to need hospital admission for pneumonia
Auckland kids are five times more likely than those in other developed countries to need hospital admission for pneumonia
 
  DailyProgress.com | UVA study links walking with dementia prevention
DailyProgress.com | UVA study links walking with dementia prevention
 
  SciDev.Net
SciDev.Net
 
  Nanotechnology: a food production revolution in waiting
Nanotechnology: a food production revolution in waiting
 
  Scoop: Good News On Samoan Maternal Mental Health
Scoop: Good News On Samoan Maternal Mental Health
 
  New Zealand News - NZ - Early paracetamol use linked to asthma
New Zealand News - NZ - Early paracetamol use linked to asthma
 
  Boston.com / News / Nation / Panel urges suicide warnings on 9 drugs
Boston.com / News / Nation / Panel urges suicide warnings on 9 drugs
 
  Electronic News - U.S. Leadership in Nanoscience A Priority, Survey Says - 9/14/2004 - Electronic News - CA452853
Electronic News - U.S. Leadership in Nanoscience A Priority, Survey Says - 9/14/2004 - Electronic News - CA452853
 
  Government Computer News (GCN) daily news -- federal, state and local government technology; NIH to provide $144 million for cancer nanotechnology
Government Computer News (GCN) daily news -- federal, state and local government technology; NIH to provide $144 million for cancer nanotechnology
 
  Association for Asia Research- China's nanotech revolution
Association for Asia Research- China's nanotech revolution
 
  Fracture Management Products Leading Growth in the $4.7 Billion U.S. Osteoporosis Market, According to a New Analysis from Health Research International
Fracture Management Products Leading Growth in the $4.7 Billion U.S. Osteoporosis Market, According to a New Analysis from Health Research International
 
  WIStv.com Columbia, SC: Study: More US jobs don't offer health care coverage
WIStv.com Columbia, SC: Study: More US jobs don't offer health care coverage
 
  Survey Shows Private Health Insurance Premiums Rose 11.2% in 2004
Survey Shows Private Health Insurance Premiums Rose 11.2% in 2004
Premiums Increased at Five Times the Rate of Growth in Workers' Earnings and Inflation
About Five Million Fewer Workers Covered by Their Own Employer's Health Insurance Since 2001


WASHINGTON, Sept. 9 /PRNewswire/ -- Employer-sponsored health insurance premiums increased an average of 11.2% in 2004 -- less than last year's 13.9% increase, but still the fourth consecutive year of double-digit growth, according to the 2004 Annual Employer Health Benefits Survey released by the Kaiser Family Foundation and Health Research and Educational Trust (HRET). Premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance rose at about five times the rate of inflation (2.3%) and workers' earnings (2.2%).
In 2004, premiums reached an average of $9,950 annually for family coverage ($829 per month) and $3,695 ($308 per month) for single coverage, according to the new survey. Family premiums for PPOs, which cover most workers, rose to $10,217 annually ($851 per month) in 2004, up significantly from $9,317 annually ($776 per month) in 2003. Since 2001, premiums for family coverage have risen 59%.

The survey also found that the percentage of all workers receiving health coverage from their employer in 2004 is 61%, about the same as in 2003 (62%) but down significantly from the recent peak of 65% in 2001. As a consequence, there are at least 5 million fewer jobs providing health insurance in 2004 than 2001. A likely contributing factor is a decline in the percentage of small employers (three to 199 workers) offering health insurance over this period. In 2004, 63% of all small firms offer health benefits to their workers, down from 68% in 2001.

"The cost of family health insurance is rapidly approaching the gross earnings of a full-time minimum wage worker," said Drew Altman, President and CEO of the Kaiser Family Foundation. "If these trends continue, workers and employers will find it increasingly difficult to pay for family health coverage and every year the share of Americans who have employer-sponsored health coverage will fall."

"Since 2001, the cost of health insurance has risen 59 percent. Over that period, employee contributions increased 57 percent for single coverage and 49 percent for family coverage, while workers wages have increased only 12 percent. This is why fewer small employers are offering coverage, and why fewer workers are taking-up coverage," said Jon Gabel, vice president for Health Systems Studies at the Health Research and Educational Trust.

The survey was conducted between January and May of 2004 and included 3,017 randomly selected public and private firms with three or more employees (1,925 of which responded to the full survey and 1,092 of which responded to an additional question about offering coverage). This is the sixth year the joint survey was conducted by Kaiser and HRET, and the 17th year this survey has been conducted overall. Findings appear in the September/October issue of the journal Health Affairs.

Survey highlights include:

-- Worker contributions. This year, workers on average contribute $558 of
the $3,695 annual premium cost of single coverage and $2,661 of the
$9,950 cost of premiums for family coverage. Average employee
contributions for single coverage are statistically unchanged from
2003, while average employee contributions for family coverage grew by
10% -- a similar rate to the average overall premium increase. The
percentage of premiums paid by workers is statistically unchanged over
the last several years, at 16% for single coverage and 28% for family
coverage.
-- Cost-sharing. Cost sharing rose modestly in 2004 compared to the
larger increases observed in recent years. Most covered workers are in
health plans that require a deductible be met before most plan benefits
are provided. In PPO plans, which cover more than half of all workers
with health benefits, the average deductible for single coverage is
$287 for services from preferred providers and $558 for services from
non-preferred providers, about the same as in 2003. In addition, half
of covered workers must either pay a separate deductible (average $224)
or pay additional co-insurance (averaging 16% of the costs) when they
are admitted to the hospital. The proportion of covered workers facing
a $20 copayment for an office visit increased to 27% in 2004 from 19%
in 2003.
-- Consumer-driven plans. While about 10% of all firms offer a
high-deductible plan to covered workers this year, only about 3.5% of
those firms offer a personal or savings account option along with a
high-deductible plan. These accounts permit employers (and sometimes
employees) to make pre-tax contributions, which can be used by
employees to pay for routine medical care. The survey finds that
employers, particularly larger firms, are interested in high-deductible
plans (a plan with a deductible of at least $1,000 for single
coverage). About 6% of all firms (accounting for 13% of covered
workers) say that they are "very likely" to offer such a plan within
two years, and another 21% of all firms (accounting for 26% of covered
workers) say that they are "somewhat likely" to do so.
-- Type of insurance. In 2004, PPOs continue to be the most common form
of health coverage, with more than half (55%) of all employees with
health coverage enrolling in a PPO. HMOs, which cost significantly
less than PPOs, cover about 25% of covered workers. Conventional, or
indemnity, benefit plans have all but disappeared, covering just 5% of
covered workers. These enrollment shares are statistically unchanged
from 2003.


"You have to look over the past several years to really understand why Americans are so worried about health care costs. Just for premium contributions alone, families are paying $1,000 more this year for their health coverage than they paid in 2000," Dr. Altman said. "More than any other factor, these out-of-pocket cost increases are what's driving voter concern about health."

Facing continued premium increases, many employers say they looked to make cost-saving changes in the past year. Among firms offering coverage, 56% report that they shopped for a new plan in the past year. Of those firms, 31% (17% overall) report changing insurance carriers in the past year and 34% (19% overall) report changing the type of health plan offered.

When asked about future plans, about half (52%) of large firms (200 or more workers) say they are "very likely" to increase employee contributions in the next year. In contrast, just 15% of small firms (3 to 199 workers) say that they are "very likely" to increase employee contributions next year.

Across all firms offering coverage, relatively low percentages say that they are "very likely" in the next year to raise deductibles (9%), raise office visit cost-sharing (5%), raise prescription drug copayments (5%), introduce tiered networks for physicians or hospitals (2%), or restrict eligibility for benefits (1%). In addition, 3% of firms say they are "very likely" to drop health coverage entirely in the near future.

"Employers continue to look for ways to control the rising costs of health insurance, with more than half shopping around for a better option and one in six actually changing insurance carriers," said Gary Claxton, Vice President and the Director of the Health Care Marketplace Project at the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Methodology

The Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research and Educational Trust 2004 Annual Employer Health Benefits Survey (Kaiser/HRET) reports findings from a survey of 3,017 randomly selected public and private employers, including 1,925 who responded to the full survey and 1,092 who indicated whether or not they provide health coverage. Kaiser/HRET drew its sample from a Dun & Bradstreet list of the nation's employers with three or more workers. The Kaiser/HRET Employer Benefits Survey is based on previous surveys sponsored by the Health Insurance Association of America from 1987-1990 and KPMG from 1991-1998. Researchers at the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Health Research and Educational Trust designed and analyzed the survey and National Research LLC conducted the field work between January and May 2004. The overall response rate for the survey was 50%. All statistical tests are performed at the 0.05 level except where otherwise noted. Beginning with the 2003 Survey, several methodological changes were made to the survey, including standardizing survey weights to U.S. Census data. Therefore, historical data in the exhibits may differ slightly from previously published estimates.

Individual copies of the survey report and the summary of findings are available on the web at www.kff.org/insurance/7148. Multiple copies of the report may be obtained from HRET by calling 1-800-242-2626 (order #097512). To obtain a copy of the September/October 2004 issue of Health Affairs, contact Jon Gardner at 301-656-7401 or press@healthaffairs.org. This article is also available on the journal's web site, www.healthaffairs.org.

The Kaiser Family Foundation is a non-profit, private operating foundation dedicated to providing information and analysis on health care issues to policymakers, the media, the health care community, and the general public. The foundation is not associated with Kaiser Permanente or Kaiser Industries.

The Health Research and Educational Trust is a private, not-for-profit organization involved in research, education, and demonstration programs addressing health management and policy issues. Founded in 1944, HRET collaborates with health care, government, academic, business, and community organizations across the United States to conduct research and disseminate findings that help shape the future of health care.


 
  IOL: �Half of Irish children have tooth decay by age 12�
IOL: �Half of Irish children have tooth decay by age 12�
 
  'Knowledge discovery' could speed creation of new products
'Knowledge discovery' could speed creation of new products
 
  Science Blog - 'Brain' in a dish acts as autopilot, living computer
Science Blog - 'Brain' in a dish acts as autopilot, living computer
 

Name:
Location: Calgary

I am a social Entrepreneur a social-Preneur. I am a thalidomider and a wheelchair user. I am a biochemist and a bioethicist. I am a scientist and an activist. I work on issues related to bioethics, health research, disabled and other marginalized people's and human rights, governance of science and technology and evaluation of new and emerging technologies. I am the founder of the International Centre for Bioethics, Culture and Disability and of the International Network on Bioethics and Disability. I believe that a wide open public debate on how the above issues affect society and marginalized groups is the only way to develop safeguards against abuse. I believe that so far marginalized groups are rarely heard in this debate. Therefore I try to increase the visibility of marginalized groups on governmental, academic, civil society, national and international level. I hope that the tools I offer (webpage, listserves, briefing papers, workshops, lectures and online courses) help people from marginalized groups to increase their knowledge and I hope my tools help others to obtain a more differentiated picture of people from marginalized groups and how the issues affect them.

ARCHIVES
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