My thoughts on social and scientific issues
Tuesday, August 16, 2005
 
Nanotubes May Heal Broken Bones Carbon nanotubes could buttress brittle or broken human bones. New research brings the buckytubes one step closer to the clinic. By Aaron Dalton.
[via Wired News: Technology]
 
 
HIV Treatment Raises Cure Hopes A strategy to awaken dormant HIV gives a glimmer of hope for patients to get off the lifelong regimen of meds and consider themselves cured. Some experts warn it's doubtful the treatment will be that effective.
[via Wired News: Technology]
 
 
A Blank Czech for Nanotech While Malta and Lichtenstein may be lagging in the euronanotech league (although probably not losing too much sleep over it) the Czech republic has just announced a major raft of funding in a program called "Nanotechnology for Society." The funding...
[via TNTlog]
 
 
Egypt: Millennium Development Goals, Second Country Report
[via Development Gateway Topics | Capacity Development for MDGs | Latest Resources]
 
 
The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning
[via Development Gateway Topics | Knowledge Economy | Latest Resources]
 
 
Cheap internet calls for Kenyans The Kenyan government is set to issue licences for firms to offer phone calls over the internet, officials say.
[via BBC News | Technology | UK Edition]
 
 
RFID: The Future Is in the Chips The market for tiny electronic data markers has been developing for years but has yet to hit on a clear commercial formula. Still, opportunities abound for the cautious investor. Commentary by Joanna Glasner.
[via Wired News]
 
 
Whew! Your DNA Isn't Your Destiny If you're not thrilled about your gene pool, don't worry: DNA may not seal your fate. The epigenome could come to the rescue. By Brandon Keim.
[via Wired News]
 
 
US brand name drug prices up, generics level: AARP WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Prices for the brand name prescription drugs most commonly used by older patients rose at a clip three times higher than inflation during the first quarter of this year, while generic drug prices were nearly flat, a report released Tuesday found.
[via Reuters Health eLine]
 
 
Biotech companies scramble to develop brain-related products (Seattle Times) The prospect of a billion people nearing the age when they risk brain-related illnesses like Alzheimer's disease or chronic pain is helping...
[via Yahoo! News - Search Results for "Brain machine"]
 
 
National Cancer Institute wants to end lung cancer by 2015 With two high-profile cases in public eye, National Cancer Institute commits to employing nanotechnology and simple antismoking effort
[via Blogdigger search for nanotechnology]
 
 
Urine Powered Battery Developed














Posted by ScuttleMonkey (36% noise) View
Saeed al-Sahaf writes “Research investment into developing smaller and cheaper chips to process information in disposable health tests has been significant, but they were still reliant on an external power source. The researchers at Singapore’s Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology think they have overcome this problem with their latest urine powered battery. From the article “The battery is composed of paper, soaked in copper chloride, sandwiched between layers of magnesium and copper. The whole thing, once laminated in plastic, is just a millimeter thick, and 6cm by 3cm in size.” The breakthrough promises a cheap and disposable power source for home health tests.”


Couch potatoes rejoice!!! - by lcllam (Score: 4, Funny) Thread
Great! Now I don’t even have to get off the couch to change the batteries in my remote anymore. And as a side benefit, I don’t have to *share* the remote anymore.


Are they sure that it’s urine powered? - by ChiralSoftware (Score: 5, Informative) Thread
It sounds like it’s using urine as an electrolyte. That’s like a “potato battery”, which again is just using the potato as an electrolyte, and is not getting any power from it.


———————— 
mobile search - try it on your phone




End of sentence missing - by Tom7 (Score: 4, Interesting) Thread
The breakthrough promises a cheap and disposable power source for home health tests. … that you pee on.


Wrong - by Anonymous Coward (Score: 5, Informative) Thread
1 battery outputs 1.5 mW / 1.5V = 1mA 
 
theoretically you could get 1A at 1.5V by wiring them in parallel, OR 1mA at 1500V by wiring them serial, both outputting 1.5W of power.


Logical extension: - by GeneralEmergency (Score: 5, Funny) Thread
 
 
A Pee-Powered Peltier Six Pack Cooler! 
 
Ok, so the first two beers are warm. I could live with it. 


[via Blogdigger search for nanotechnology]
 
 
'Smart' Nanoprobes Light Up Disease: Quantum Dots Programmed To Glow In Presen via Medical Buzz: Researchers from Rice University's Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology (CBEN) have developed a "smart" beacon hundreds of times smaller than a human cell that is programmed to ...
[via Blogdigger search for nanotechnology]
 
 
Human Body 2.0 - The future of the body
Better . . . Stronger . . . Faster . . .

Brain chips that enable us to control machines with our thoughts. Kidneys and lungs built to order in the lab. Pills to make you smarter and more creative. An implant that gives you a tan and protects against skin cancer. All these innovations are in development; some are already being tested on human subjects.

The next technological frontier will be our own bodies. Genetics, materials science, tissue engineering and nanotechnology are already yielding products to help the sick and injured, including a Band-Aid-like heart patch and the C-leg prosthesis for amputees. But we are entering a century in which medical science...

http://www.popsci.com/popsci/futurebody

[via Blogdigger search for nanotechnology]
 
 
Cyberonics Neurodevice Receives Approval Recommendation For Depression Correction: The FDA didn't approve the device yet, the panel recommended approval after they meet certain requirements for labeling, protocols for dosing, and a few other things - final approval/launch expected in late May. Cyberonics shares soared Thursday after the...
[via Brain Waves]
 
 
Mental Illness in Europe Reinstitutionalization in Europe and Acculturation in the U.S....
[via Brain Waves]
 
 
NeuroWiki, Really. NeuroWiki is yet another example of how wikis are transforming how humans collaborate and share information. Wikis are being used for everything, including: music, gmail, business and education. While wikipedia is perhaps the best public example of their potential, many...
[via Brain Waves]
 
 
NBIC 2005 - Converging Technologies for Improving Human Performance As nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science advance, researchers are now discovering new ways to integrate their findings (see NBIC research grants) This convergence will bring new approaches to what are currently very diverse areas of research - converging...
[via Brain Waves]
 
 
Interpreting the Political Brain Steven Johnson wrote a nice piece in the NYTimes Magazine this past weekend on the Political Brain. While I've covered this research a few month's back in neuromarketing our next President, Steven adds one very important point to the value...
[via Brain Waves]
 
Saturday, August 13, 2005
  teaching online courses now
if you are interested let me know.
I also do webcam workshops by now through MSN messenger 7.0 and a normal computer
 
  Bangkok Charter for Health Promotion in a globalized world”
The Bangkok Charter for Health Promotion in a globalized world
Introduction
The Bangkok Charter identifies the strategies and commitments that are required to address the determinants of health in a globalized world through health promotion. It affirms that policies and partnerships to empower communities, and to improve health and health equality should be at the centre of global and national development.
The Bangkok Charter complements and builds upon the values, principles and action strategies of health promotion established by the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the recommendations of the subsequent global health promotion conferences. These are shared by activists and practitioners around the world and have been confirmed by Member States through the World Health Assembly.
The Bangkok Charter reaches out to people, groups and organizations that are critical to the achievement of health. This includes governments and politicians at all levels, civil society, the private sector and international organisations.
Health promotion
The United Nations recognize that the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without discrimination. Health promotion is based on this critical human right. It offers a positive and inclusive concept of health as a determinant of the quality of life, and encompasses mental and spiritual well being. Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and thereby improve their health. Health promotion is a core function of public health and contributes to tackling communicable and noncommunicable diseases and other threats to health. It is an effective investment in improving health and human development. It contributes to reducing both health and gender inequities.
Addressing the determinants of health
The context for health promotion has changed markedly since the development of the Ottawa Charter. Increasing inequalities within and between countries, new patterns of consumption and communication, commercialisation, environmental degradation, and urbanization are some of the critical factors that influence health. Rapid and often adverse social change affects working conditions, learning environments, family patterns and the culture and social fabric of communities. Evolving patterns of health and demographic transitions have also contributed to change. Women and men are affected differently by these developments; the vulnerability of children and exclusion of marginalised, disabled and indigenous peoples have increased.
Globalization can open up new opportunities for cooperation to improve health, for example through improved mechanisms for global governance and enhanced information technology and communication, and sharing of experiences. Health promotion strategies can address avoidable transnational health risks by enabling policies and partnerships which ensure that benefits for health from globalization are maximised and equitable, and the negative effects are minimised and mitigated.
To manage the challenges of globalisation, policy must be coherent across all levels of governments, United Nations bodies and other organizations, including the private sector. This will strengthen compliance, transparency and accountability with international agreements and treaties that affect health. The global commitment to reduce poverty by addressing all of the Millennium Development Goals is a critical entry point for health promotion action. The active participation of civil society is crucial in this process. Progress has been made in placing health at the centre of development, but much more remains to be achieved.
Strategies for health promotion in a globalized world
Progress towards a healthier world requires strong political action, broad participation and sustained advocacy. Health promotion has an established repertoire of proven effective strategies which need to be fully utilised. To make further advances all sectors and settings must act to:
Advocate for health based on human rights and solidarity;
Invest in sustainable policies, actions and infrastructure to address the determinants of health;
Build capacity for policy development, leadership, health promotion practice, knowledge transfer and research, and health literacy;
Regulate and legislate to ensure a high level of protection from harm and enable equal opportunity for health and well being for all people;
Partner and build alliances with public, private, nongovernmental organizations and civil society to create sustainable actions.
Commitments to health for all
Make the promotion of health central to the global development agenda
Government and international bodies must act to close the gap in health between rich and poor. Strong intergovernmental agreements that increase health and collective health security need to be in place. Effective mechanisms for global governance for health are needed to address all harmful effects of trade, products, services and marketing strategies. Health promotion must become an integral part of domestic and foreign policy and international relations, including in situations of war and conflict. This requires actions to promote dialogue and cooperation among nation states, civil society, and the private sector. These efforts can build on the example of existing treaties such as the World Health Organization Framework Convention for Tobacco Control.
Make the promotion of health a core responsibility for all of government
Health determines socio-economic and political development. Therefore governments at all levels must tackle poor health and inequalities as a matter of urgency. The health sector has a key role to provide leadership in building policies and partnerships for health promotion. Responsibility to address the determinants of health rests with the whole of government, and depends upon actions by many sectors as well as the health sector. An integrated policy approach within government, and a commitment to working with civil society and the private sector and across settings, is essential to make progress in addressing these determinants. Local, regional and national governments must give priority to investments in health, within and outside the health sector, and provide sustainable financing for health promotion. To ensure this, all levels of government should make the health consequences of policies and legislation explicit, using tools such as equity focussed health impact assessment, and intersectoral national or local health plans.
Make the promotion of health a key focus of communities and civil society
Communities and civil society often lead in initiating, shaping and undertaking health promotion. They need to have rights, resources and opportunities so that that their contributions are amplified and sustained. Support for capacity building is particularly important in less developed communities. Well organized and empowered communities are highly effective in determining their own health, and are capable of making governments and the private sector accountable for the health consequences of their policies and practices. Civil society needs to exercise its power in the marketplace by giving preference to the goods, services and shares of companies that exemplify corporate social responsibility. Grass roots community projects, civil society groups, and women’s organizations have demonstrated their effectiveness in health promotion, and provide models of practice for others to follow. Health professional associations have a special contribution to make.
Make the promotion of health a requirement for good corporate practices
The private sector has a direct impact on the health of people and on the determinants of health through their influence on local settings and national cultures, environments and wealth distribution. The private sector, like other employers and the informal sector, has a responsibility to ensure health and safety in the workplace, and promote the health and well being of their employees, their families and communities. They also contribute to wider global health impacts, such as those associated with global environmental change. The private sector must ensure that its actions comply with local, national and international regulations and agreements that promote and protect health. Ethical and responsible business practices and fair trade exemplify the type of business practice that should be supported by consumers and civil society, and by government incentives and regulations.
A global pledge to make it happen
Meeting these commitments requires better application of existing, proven strategies, as well as the use of new entry points and innovative responses. Partnerships, alliances, networks and collaborations provide exciting and rewarding ways of bringing people and organizations together around common goals and joint actions to improve the health of populations. Each sector - government, civil society and private - has a unique role and responsibility. Progress in addressing the underlying determinants of health in many cases will only occur by working together so that resources can be used more effectively and efficiently to achieve lasting results.
Since the adoption of the Ottawa Charter, a significant number of resolutions at national and global level have been signed in support of health promotion, but this has not always been followed by action. The participants of this Bangkok Conference forcefully call on Member States and the World Health Organization to close this implementation gap and move to policies and partnerships for action. This will require political leadership.
Conference participants expect the World Health Organization, in collaboration with others, to work with Member States to allocate resources, initiate a plan of action, monitor performance through appropriate indicators and targets, and report on progress at regular intervals. To support this process United Nations organisations are asked to explore the benefits of developing and implementing a Global Treaty for Health.
This Bangkok Charter urges everyone to join in a worldwide partnership to promote health, with both global and local engagement and action.
We, the participants of the 6th Global Conference on Health Promotion in Bangkok, Thailand, pledge to advance these commitments to improve health and to advocate for the required resources, policies and practices.
11 August 2005
Note: This charter contains the collective views of an international group of experts, participants to the 6th Global Conference on Health Promotion, Bangkok, Thailand, August, 2005, and does not necessarily represent the decisions or the stated policy of the World Health Organization.
RELATED LINKS
- Press release: New Bangkok charter for health promotion adopted to address rapidly changing global health issues - The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion
 
Wednesday, March 30, 2005
  Implications of the Convergence of Nano-Scale Technologies for Disabled People
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/nanotechnology/highlights/showMore.do
 
 
"Why nanotech holds the key to future"
[via Development Gateway Topics | Nanotechnology for Development | Latest Resources]
 
 
"Breakthrough suggests nanotech applications for food safety"
[via Development Gateway Topics | Nanotechnology for Development | Latest Resources]
 
 
Innovation: Applying Knowledge in Development
[via Development Gateway Topics | Nanotechnology for Development | Latest Resources]
 
 
"India Alters Law on Drug Patents"
[via Development Gateway Topics | Nanotechnology for Development | Latest Resources]
 
 
"India Alters Law on Drug Patents"
[via Development Gateway Topics | Nanotechnology for Development | Latest Resources]
 
Tuesday, February 15, 2005
  sustainablog: Doing Double-Duty
sustainablog: Doing Double-Duty
 
Monday, February 14, 2005
  The Buzz Report: RFID: bring it on - CNET.com
The Buzz Report: RFID: bring it on - CNET.com
 
Sunday, February 13, 2005
  Techdirt:Rapid Prototyping Your Health
Techdirt:Rapid Prototyping Your Health
 
  Reuters Health Information (2005-02-11): Herbal remedy as good as drug for depression: study
Reuters Health Information (2005-02-11): Herbal remedy as good as drug for depression: study
 
  February 11, 2005, Hour One: News Roundup: Gum Disease and Heart Disease / Social Constraints on Science / 'Open Source' Biology?
February 11, 2005, Hour One: News Roundup: Gum Disease and Heart Disease / Social Constraints on Science / 'Open Source' Biology?
 
  CybDem: Brain-Machine-Interface takes shape
CybDem: Brain-Machine-Interface takes shape
 
  Cancer Articles & News: Rainforest Plant Yields Breast Cancer Fighter
Cancer Articles & News: Rainforest Plant Yields Breast Cancer Fighter
 
  Exploring Nanotechnology | Presentation
Exploring Nanotechnology | Presentation
 
  Responsible Nanotechnology: Good news from Washington
Responsible Nanotechnology: Good news from Washington
 
  His Nibs: Inventor Kurzweil Aiming to Live Forever
His Nibs: Inventor Kurzweil Aiming to Live Forever
 
  Reason: Do Drug Companies Kill Poor People? How for-profit medicine helps even the poorest
Reason: Do Drug Companies Kill Poor People? How for-profit medicine helps even the poorest
 
  Is Lovesickness a Psychiatric Disorder?: Corante > Brain Waves >
Is Lovesickness a Psychiatric Disorder?: Corante > Brain Waves >
 
  Mental Illness in Europe: Corante > Brain Waves >
Mental Illness in Europe: Corante > Brain Waves >
 
  NBIC 2005 - Converging Technologies for Improving Human Performance: Corante > Brain Waves >
NBIC 2005 - Converging Technologies for Improving Human Performance: Corante > Brain Waves >
 
  Why Define the Neurotechology Industry?: Corante > Brain Waves >
Why Define the Neurotechology Industry?: Corante > Brain Waves >
 
  Mental Illness in Europe: Corante > Brain Waves >
Mental Illness in Europe: Corante > Brain Waves >
 
Friday, January 07, 2005
  New, better arthritis drugs on way, but going is slow
New, better arthritis drugs on way, but going is slow
 
  The Globe and Mail: AIDS survey in Uganda bungled: whistleblower
The Globe and Mail: AIDS survey in Uganda bungled: whistleblower
 
  Physics Today June 2004- Scholars Probe Nanotechnology's Promise and Its Potential Problems
Physics Today June 2004- Scholars Probe Nanotechnology's Promise and Its Potential Problems
 

Name:
Location: Calgary

I am a social Entrepreneur a social-Preneur. I am a thalidomider and a wheelchair user. I am a biochemist and a bioethicist. I am a scientist and an activist. I work on issues related to bioethics, health research, disabled and other marginalized people's and human rights, governance of science and technology and evaluation of new and emerging technologies. I am the founder of the International Centre for Bioethics, Culture and Disability and of the International Network on Bioethics and Disability. I believe that a wide open public debate on how the above issues affect society and marginalized groups is the only way to develop safeguards against abuse. I believe that so far marginalized groups are rarely heard in this debate. Therefore I try to increase the visibility of marginalized groups on governmental, academic, civil society, national and international level. I hope that the tools I offer (webpage, listserves, briefing papers, workshops, lectures and online courses) help people from marginalized groups to increase their knowledge and I hope my tools help others to obtain a more differentiated picture of people from marginalized groups and how the issues affect them.

ARCHIVES
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